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Once we saw the design, they knew we couldn’t go back
Driving any vehicle over a septic tank is an accident waiting to happen
Four unfunded bills would cost the industry billions
New management service addresses major impound “pain points”
Lightweight non-sparking tube that makes uprighting easier
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Dec. 4-7, 2019
American Towman Magazine Presents the Week in Towing October 16 - October 22, 2019

Officer, Attorney Arrested [b]on Grand Theft Charges

Riviera Beach (Florida) police officer Marvin Williams and his wife, attorney Gloria Floyd-Williams, were arrested Sept. 25 on grand theft auto and burglary charges after deputies said they took Floyd-Williams' car illegally from a repossession lot.

According to the arrest report, surveillance video shows Floyd-Williams entering the lot, getting into her car and then driving back through the gate, hitting a parked car in the process; the video shows her husband letting her through the gate, closing it and then fleeing.

"Floyd-Williams did not have the authority nor permission to enter the fenced compound of ATR, had not signed the proper paperwork or paid any fees due for the vehicle to be redeemed," the report said.

Floyd-Williams and Williams came back later and told deputies they had gotten a release from the bank and the manager refused to release her car so she took it, but deputies said there was probable cause for the charges.

Floyd-Williams said the tow company was trying to hold her car illegally after she provided documentation showing it was supposed to be released.

Her lawyer said the tow company was in the wrong.

"The charges will be dropped, that's the word I got. And I'm going after the tow company for the information they gave the police officers," her attorney said.

The St. Lucie County Sheriff's Office said they are moving forward with the case and have no knowledge of the charges being dropped.

Officer Williams was relieved of all law enforcement duties effective September 26, and was placed on paid administrative leave pending the outcome of the criminal proceedings and an internal affairs investigation.

Source: wpbf.com.
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APTO Convention Set for [b] The Towman Games

The Association of Professional Towers-Ohio will hold its 2020 annual convention, picnic and training activities in conjunction with the new Towman Games at the Huntington Convention Center in Cleveland, Ohio, on June 17-20, 2020.

“APTO is excited to be a part of American Towman's innovative inaugural event that will introduce a new level of training experiences for tow business owners. Promoting training and compliance is part of the core mission of APTO,” the association said in a press release.

The four-day Towman Games will be an event filled with advance training and education in quick clearance, carrier operations, Xtreme Recovery and a business management conference related to increasing the profitability of today's tow business. The schedule will include a two-day industry trade show on June 19-20.

Source: APTO.
A British Man Finds Towing Safety Inspiration in America: Slow Down, Move Over a Worldwide Problem

Treed & Freed; Airplane Recovery in Central Jersey

0 acd7eBy Jim “Buck” Sorrenti

On Sept. 25, 2019, Mike Sena, owner and operator of Mike’s Towing & Recovery in Bridgewater, New Jersey, received a call from the Central Jersey Airport requesting that he handle the complete recovery of a single-engine Cessna 172 airplane that crashed the day before. The plane was suspended about 75’ up, on top of trees in the middle of the woods on State Park Commission land.

A 32-year-old pilot was on his way to the airport in Hillsborough when the Cessna 172, owned by Tri-State Aviation, suffered an engine stall and crashed into the trees. The pilot was stuck in the trees for about four hours before Keiling Tree Care helped rescue him. The plane remained suspended above the ground for about three days.

All heavy equipment was needed: two large excavators, a Caterpillar 325 excavator with bucket and a 333 with clamp attachment and a Caterpillar D6 Dozer, were brought to the site after hours.

Mike’s also brought its 2014 Peterbilt 388 tractor hooked to a 2017 Landoll trailer which was used to transport his 135’ shooting boom JLG all-terrain machine to and from the recovery area. An oversize permit was needed.

At 7 a.m. on Sept. 26, the crews were in full swing. They did not stop until the road was cut in and the complete site was cleared of all necessary trees. Besides the heavy equipment there were five men with chainsaws dropping trees to be cleared with the machines.

“This particular recovery proved to be a challenge due to the heavily wooded area where the plane went down,” Sena said. “After waiting for the FAA and NTSB inspection, we had the entire land cleared in a single day. Under normal circumstances this would have been a two-day job minimum. This was a very time-sensitive recovery because the park police could not leave the location until the plane was recovered and off of the property. Police were stationed there 24/7.”

Sena, lead supervisor on scene, responded along with MTR operators Gene Meeks, Dirk Beasley and Rich Weinreich. All necessary equipment was scheduled to arrive at 8:30 a.m. on Sept. 27.

MTR’s 2020 Peterbilt 389 tractor with sleeper hooked to a 2019 Landoll 440 53’ trailer rolled in carrying his Gehle 552 all-terrain extendable-reach forklift. That would transport the recovery trailer off tarmac and into the woods. The Landoll would also be used to transport the plane to Hangar No. 7 at the airport.

Mike’s 2006 Peterbilt 335/Century 3212 16-ton medium-duty wrecker arrived pulling the 18’ Featherlite recovery trailer. This trailer was equipped with everything that might be needed: straps, shackles, clevis pins, chainsaws and more.

“Perhaps the most important pieces in the trailer are the safety radio headsets used on all recovery jobs. We have sets (eight headsets) of Sonetics wireless headsets,” Sena said. “These proved invaluable throughout the entire recovery process. Every person on scene had a headset on and was able to communicate with one another. For safety reasons everyone was in constant total communication. This absolutely helped make a smoother and faster recovery.

“The 50-ton truck mounted crane with a 135-foot stick was also setting up,” Sena said, “so we had the crane and our 135-foot shooting boom truck on one side and Keiling Tree Care’s specialized, 8748 spider, 85-foot boom lift remote-control track machine on the other side.”

Once everything was in place, the airport was shut down, the boom on the crane was extended fully, all straps were installed for safe lifting and the plane was raised off and out of the trees, boomed around and set gently on the ground. The airport was given the OK to re-open.

Rigging was then removed from the plane and was re-rigged with straps, transported out of the wooded area and carried out to the roadway via the excavator and set onto MTR’s Landoll. The casualty was properly strapped down and transported back to the Central Jersey Regional Airport.

The extendable-reach forklift was brought to the airport and the plane was lifted off of the Landoll, set on the ground and pushed into Hangar No. 7 for investigation.

Many thanks to MTR operators Gene Meeks and Rich Weinreich for the outstanding photos and to Joyce Powers for providing much needed additional information on this very technical recovery.

Editor’s Note: Look for the detailed version of this recovery in an upcoming issue of American Towman Magazine.

Show Yours @ TIW
Do you have a recovery to share with TIW readers? Send some pics and info to our Field Editor Jim “Buck” Sorrenti at jimchaos69@yahoo.com; your story may even be selected for print in American Towman magazine!

Having a Good Heart

One of the recurring themes I’ve been coming across in recent weeks is “the other side” of what I touched upon a few weeks ago. There are many towmen—I would say the vast majority of you—who have the natural instinct to help people in dire circumstances.

A towman helps an elderly male stuck in his car in deep floodwaters. The first instinct of a towman after he nearly gets hit by an SUV is to run over to check on the condition of the driver who flipped over after running off the side of the towman’s car carrier. There’s this week’s lead news item of the towman who towed and repaired a car given to a woman who had no funds for either—and who tragically lost her child in a recent freak accident.

You see, that’s the good heart of most towmen; you’re always willing to help out. You’re members of your communities, and those good deeds go a long, long way.

If karma plays any role in it … the towing industry will always be blessed with good fortune.

--Charles Duke

Landoll's 440B Tandem Axle Trailer

Landoll440B b7472The Landoll 440B is a tandem axle trailer with a capacity of up to 40 tons. It is available in 41′, 48′, 53′, and California legal 50′ lengths. Handle tough equipment including super low clearance pavers with an easy one-man operation. Come see what Landoll has to offer during the American Towman Exposition, Dec. 4-7 at the Atlantic City Convention Center in Atlantic City, New Jersey.

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By Don Lomax
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The way to make the “Move Over” law more effective would be to:
Make the minimum violation fine at least $500
Temporary suspension of the motorist's license
Points against driver's license
More highway signage reminders about law
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Editor: Charles Duke
Managing Editor: Brendan Dooley
ATTV Editor & Anchor: Emily Oz
Advertising Sales (800-732-3869):
Dennie Ortiz x213, Ellen Rosengart x203,
William Burwell x208, Peggy Calabrese x202
Content Management: Henri Calitri
Site Progr., Graphics & Video: Ryan Oser
ATTV Technical Production: OMG National
Wrecks + Recovery Editor: Jim "Buck" Sorrenti
Operations Editor: Randall C. Resch
Tow Business Editor: Brian J. Riker
Tow Illustrated Editor: George L. Nitti
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October 16 - October 22, 2019
The Indiana Towing and Wrecker Association and other interested groups are hosting their second annual Move Over Indiana Day at the Indiana State Fairgrounds in Indianapolis, Saturday, October 19.

Governor Declares October 13-19 Indiana Move Over Week

The Indiana Towing and Wrecker Association and other interested groups are hosting a second annual Move Over Indiana Day in the parking lot south of the Indiana State Fairgrounds in Indianapolis, on Saturday, Oct. 19, from 9-11:30 a.m. This event provides the community an opportunity to meet and speak with professionals from the varying occupations for whom Indiana’s Move Over Law benefits the most. Indiana Governor Eric J. Holcomb has declared the week of October 13-19, 2019 be recognized as Indiana Move Over Week. In 1999, Indiana was the first state in the nation to pass the law. Over the years, Indiana’s law has expanded to include stationary towing/recovery, utility service, solid waste haulers, road, street highway maintenance vehicles, as well as a stationary survey or construction vehicles when displaying alternately flashing amber lights. Source: wbiw.com.

September Truck Sales Break 13-Year Record

Preliminary U.S. Class 8 truck retail sales totaled 28,200 units last month, according to FTR, a transportation data analysis firm. Sales were up 20 percent month-over-month and 20 percent year-over-year with all OEMs reporting robust activity for the month. Sales had been strong for the previous five months and September was expected to be similar, but FTR VP of Commercial Vehicles Don Ake said last month should be considered a fluke as fleets delayed taking some deliveries during the summer and the sales all closed in September. “It will be a much tighter market going forward as fleet expansion slows due to the weaker freight environment,” Ake said. “The market is slipping back to replacement level, but fleets are still profitable, so this should stabilize sales.” Source: ccjdigital.com.

Tow Company Sues Town over Rotation Removal

A towing company is challenging a Southold Town (New York) Police Department decision to remove them from the rotation of approved towing companies. According to a lawsuit filed Sept. 16 in Suffolk County Court, Phil Wilkinson, who owns Wilk’s 24 Hour Towing & Recovery, alleges that the police department acted “arbitrarily and capriciously” when his company was removed from their list in May. In the filing, Wilkinson claims he was advised the company was being removed from the list, but wasn’t given a reason why. Wilkinson argues his company never refused a towing assignment and was never unavailable to respond. Town attorney Bill Duffy said in an interview that the decision was made after the town received “several complaints” about the company. The court filing does not seek any monetary compensation but instead asks for the company to be reinstated on the list. Source: suffolktimes.timesreview.com.


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Don't Miss It!
Join Jim Figueira and Ed Grubbs of Environmental Chemical Solutions for a presentation that addresses the leaks and staining at vehicle storage facilities from damaged vehicles. Their seminar, “The Uncontaminated Vehicle Storage Facility,” will explore proper best management procedures that address and eliminates the staining from these leaks. Their seminar will be presented during the American Towman Exposition, Dec. 4-7, at the Atlantic City Convention Center in Atlantic City, New Jersey. Register today! atexposition.com

atexposition.com
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October 16 - October 22, 2019
Alvin Colon’s family business helped Tenitia Cullum, who recently lost her 3-year-old child in a terrible accident, by towing and fixing her car free of charge. Image - spectrumlocalnews.com.

Towman Helps Mother [b]Following Terrible Tragedy

A Rochester, New York, towman was hailed as a good Samaritan after helping out a woman who recently suffered a terrible loss. 

Tenitia Cullum, the mother of a 3-year-old boy who died after falling into a grease trap, had her car towed for free on Oct. 3. Cullum did not have the money to get her car repaired but a local auto shop heard about what happened on the radio and offered to repair the car for free.

Cullum had no way to get the car to the shop and that's when Alvin Colon and his family business offered to help out.

He met Tenitia and towed her car to the garage, free of charge.

"Person in need, every now and then I do this for a person in need," Colon said. "I’ve helped out other people and I heard she needed it so I donated my services."

"This car was given to me and it just needed some repairs, so I’m shocked and overwhelmed," Cullum said. "This is awesome, so I truly, truly thank everybody."

Reinaldo Colon still works at the shop he opened 50 years ago, now run by his sons, Alvin and Emilialo. Generosity is not something new to them.

"Whenever anyone had no money I let them go, but they always come back," said Reinaldo.

"Make a difference as much as we can because any helping hand is a helping hand you know, you do today for others you never know what somebody can do for you tomorrow when you least expect it," said Emilialo.

Source: spectrumlocalnews.com.

First 100-Ton Rolling Rotator [b]Launched by Miller Industries

More than 1,000 members of the towing and recovery industry were on hand as Miller Industries unveiled its Century M100, the first-ever 100-ton rolling rotator, in Chattanooga, Tennessee.

The large-scale event culminated in live demonstrations of the new Century M100, which offers 200,000-lbs. lifting capacity that was engineered, tested and documented to the highest SAE standards, Miller announced in a release.

The M100 project was originally coined “project Wildwood” to help maintain secrecy during its two years in development. Miller Industries staff put forth over 10,000 engineering hours and countless feats of manufacturing excellence to create this first-ever 100-ton rotator.

Source: millerind.com.

TRAA Joins Coalition to [b]Halt “Burdensome” Bills

The Towing and Recovery Association of America, along with a coalition of 30 other trucking and trade groups, is urging Congress to halt four bills it claims would cost the industry billions of dollars in “burdensome” unfunded mandates.

Among the four bills are: the Cullum Owings Large Truck Safe Operating Speed Act of 2019, which would mandate commercial motor vehicles over 26,000 lbs. to be equipped with speed limiters set to 65 mph; and the Insurance Act, which would increase the minimum liability coverage for motor carriers from $750,000 to over $4.9 million. This increase would apply to all businesses transporting property, not just long-haul trucking operations.

Other bills the coalition is looking to halt are the Stop Underrides Act and the Safe Roads Act, both of which would add additional costs to business owners.

The other members of the coalition include: the Agricultural Retailers Association; Agriculture Transportation Coalition; American Dairy Coalition; American Farm Bureau Federation; American Pipeline Contractors Association; American Pyrotechnics Association; Associated Equipment Distributors; Associated Oregon Loggers; Association of Professional Towers of Ohio; Corn Refiners Association; Distribution Contractors Association; Mid-West Truckers Association; National Asphalt Pavement Association; National Association of Small Trucking Companies; National Cotton Council; National Cotton Ginners’ Association; National Council of Farmer Cooperatives; National Grain and Feed Association; National Hay Association; National Ready Mixed Concrete Association; National Stone, Sand and Gravel Association; National Utility Contractors Association; National Wildfire Suppression Association; NFIB; North American Millers’ Association; Owner-Operator Independent Drivers Association; Police Towers of America; Power and Communications Contractors Association; Precast/Prestressed Concrete Institute; and United States Cattlemen’s Association.

Source: TRAA.

WTA Raises $4,300 for [b]Survivor Fund

The Wisconsin Towing Association recently donated $4,300 to the Survivor Fund at the International Towing and Recovery Museum. The monies were raised at the annual Wisconsin Tow Show and Convention through a silent auction.

Many valuable items were donated by a number of WTA members and available for bids throughout the convention. The association holds the auction annually and donates all proceeds directly to the Survivors Fund. This year marks the highest amount donated by the WTA, according to the association.

To learn more about donating directly to the Fund, check internationaltowingmuseum.org.

Source: Wisconsin Towing Association.

Daimler Receives Clean [b]Air Technology Award

Daimler Trucks North America was recognized with the 2019 Clean Air Technology award from the South Coast Air Quality Management District.

DTNA was awarded for its Innovation Fleet from Freightliner, a 30-vehicle fleet of battery-electric medium- and heavy-duty trucks currently testing integration of battery-electric commercial vehicles into large-scale transportation operations.

“We’re honored to be recognized with the Clean Air Technology Award by South Coast AQMD,” said Roger Nielsen, president/CEO of DTNA. “Our team is fully committed to co-creating the future of sustainable transportation with great customers and with great partners like South Coast AQMD.”

Source: daimler.com.

Police, DA Criticized [b]by Judge

A judge told the District Attorney’s office and the Mobile (Alabama) Police Department Oct. 3 that their decision to seize four tow trucks as part of an investigation into insurance fraud seemed unreasonable and was effectively destroying a company.

“I really can’t imagine any good reason for holding onto the trucks,” said District Court Judge Joe Basenberg. “The lifeblood of a company, which is a towing company, has been drained.”

Basenberg offered the criticism as part of an early morning hearing that would have allowed the owners of SOS Towing to have their trucks returned and continue working while an insurance fraud case moved through the courts.

However, Basenburg was unable to grant the request because the DA’s office filed a civil action forfeiture that seemingly moved jurisdiction of the case from his court and placed it in Mobile Circuit Court, a further setback on the return of the trucks and one that defense attorney Chase Dearman said was a cynical delay tactic and one that could possibly put the company out of business.

“[SOS Towing] will be bankrupt by the end of the week,” said Dearman, who added that the seizure was illegal and contravened Alabama law. “The state doesn’t care. That’s what the goal is your honor, to put him out of business. …

“They filed that (civil) forfeiture last night (Oct. 2) to keep this court from ruling on something that is just inappropriate.”

Basenberg said he would look into questions around jurisdiction.

Assistant District Attorney Clay Rossi said the benefit of a civil asset forfeiture suit meant the suspects could pay a bond and have their trucks returned. Dearman said this was something that should have been done the day after the trucks were first seized back in mid-September.

He also said that he wouldn’t be able to get the bond on the trucks because no suit had been served to his client. That suit was served in open court.

The two suspects, Gary Smith Jr. and Gary Smith Sr., were arrested Sept. 17 after spending more than two months under investigation for alleged price gouging and overcharging customers. Their company is one of five being formally investigated by MPD. 

Source: al.com.
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October 16 - October 22, 2019

Treed & Freed; Airplane Recovery in Central Jersey

0 acd7eBy Jim “Buck” Sorrenti

On Sept. 25, 2019, Mike Sena, owner and operator of Mike’s Towing & Recovery in Bridgewater, New Jersey, received a call from the Central Jersey Airport requesting that he handle the complete recovery of a single-engine Cessna 172 airplane that crashed the day before. The plane was suspended about 75’ up, on top of trees in the middle of the woods on State Park Commission land.

A 32-year-old pilot was on his way to the airport in Hillsborough when the Cessna 172, owned by Tri-State Aviation, suffered an engine stall and crashed into the trees. The pilot was stuck in the trees for about four hours before Keiling Tree Care helped rescue him. The plane remained suspended above the ground for about three days.

All heavy equipment was needed: two large excavators, a Caterpillar 325 excavator with bucket and a 333 with clamp attachment and a Caterpillar D6 Dozer, were brought to the site after hours.

Mike’s also brought its 2014 Peterbilt 388 tractor hooked to a 2017 Landoll trailer which was used to transport his 135’ shooting boom JLG all-terrain machine to and from the recovery area. An oversize permit was needed.

At 7 a.m. on Sept. 26, the crews were in full swing. They did not stop until the road was cut in and the complete site was cleared of all necessary trees. Besides the heavy equipment there were five men with chainsaws dropping trees to be cleared with the machines.

“This particular recovery proved to be a challenge due to the heavily wooded area where the plane went down,” Sena said. “After waiting for the FAA and NTSB inspection, we had the entire land cleared in a single day. Under normal circumstances this would have been a two-day job minimum. This was a very time-sensitive recovery because the park police could not leave the location until the plane was recovered and off of the property. Police were stationed there 24/7.”

Sena, lead supervisor on scene, responded along with MTR operators Gene Meeks, Dirk Beasley and Rich Weinreich. All necessary equipment was scheduled to arrive at 8:30 a.m. on Sept. 27.

MTR’s 2020 Peterbilt 389 tractor with sleeper hooked to a 2019 Landoll 440 53’ trailer rolled in carrying his Gehle 552 all-terrain extendable-reach forklift. That would transport the recovery trailer off tarmac and into the woods. The Landoll would also be used to transport the plane to Hangar No. 7 at the airport.

Mike’s 2006 Peterbilt 335/Century 3212 16-ton medium-duty wrecker arrived pulling the 18’ Featherlite recovery trailer. This trailer was equipped with everything that might be needed: straps, shackles, clevis pins, chainsaws and more.

“Perhaps the most important pieces in the trailer are the safety radio headsets used on all recovery jobs. We have sets (eight headsets) of Sonetics wireless headsets,” Sena said. “These proved invaluable throughout the entire recovery process. Every person on scene had a headset on and was able to communicate with one another. For safety reasons everyone was in constant total communication. This absolutely helped make a smoother and faster recovery.

“The 50-ton truck mounted crane with a 135-foot stick was also setting up,” Sena said, “so we had the crane and our 135-foot shooting boom truck on one side and Keiling Tree Care’s specialized, 8748 spider, 85-foot boom lift remote-control track machine on the other side.”

Once everything was in place, the airport was shut down, the boom on the crane was extended fully, all straps were installed for safe lifting and the plane was raised off and out of the trees, boomed around and set gently on the ground. The airport was given the OK to re-open.

Rigging was then removed from the plane and was re-rigged with straps, transported out of the wooded area and carried out to the roadway via the excavator and set onto MTR’s Landoll. The casualty was properly strapped down and transported back to the Central Jersey Regional Airport.

The extendable-reach forklift was brought to the airport and the plane was lifted off of the Landoll, set on the ground and pushed into Hangar No. 7 for investigation.

Many thanks to MTR operators Gene Meeks and Rich Weinreich for the outstanding photos and to Joyce Powers for providing much needed additional information on this very technical recovery.

Editor’s Note: Look for the detailed version of this recovery in an upcoming issue of American Towman Magazine.

Show Yours @ TIW
Do you have a recovery to share with TIW readers? Send some pics and info to our Field Editor Jim “Buck” Sorrenti at jimchaos69@yahoo.com; your story may even be selected for print in American Towman magazine!

Mangled Mixer in Mass, Part 2: [b]Recovering The Fully Loaded Mixer Tub

0 240e4By Jim “Buck” Sorrenti

In last week’s Tow Industry Week, we began this story of Big Wheel Towing & Recovery’s recovery work regarding a serious accident involving a fully loaded cement mixer that left the roadway at a high speed and traveled into a thickly wooded area behind the steel guardrail system. We once again follow the East Freetown, Massachusetts, company’s work in recovering the fully loaded mixer tub.

With the mixer removed from the woods, more trees, brush, and debris had to be removed by the JCB excavator in order to create a path for the mixer tub to be brought out. “As a result of the mixer tub sitting in the woods for a substantial amount of time not spinning as it would conventionally be when attached to the mixer, the concrete had solidified and was a single hardened mass inside the mixer tub,” stated Eric Fouquette.

Eleven yards of solidified concrete concentrated in one area, coupled with the weight of the mixer tub itself, creates a very heavy load. Their 2017 Kenworth/60-ton Jerr-Dan rotator and their 2016 Peterbilt/50-ton Century rolling boom rotator were needed to recover the fully loaded mixer tub from the woods.

Eric informed, “Due to the extreme weights involved, our recovery team two-parted each of the winch lines on both of our cranes in order to increase the amount of weight that could be handled by the cranes. Each of the winch lines were spooled out from the roadway to the area where the mixer tub was located and heavy duty recovery chains were ran through the two holes that were previously cut out in the front of the mixer tub.”

With the necessary rigging installed, both rotator operators worked in tandem and began slowly bringing the fully loaded mixer tub out from the wooded area and up the embankment. The rotators had to simultaneously keep the front of the mixer tub partially elevated off the ground while winching it up the embankment.

“If both of these actions were not done in unison, it would only cause the mixer tub to dig into the ground ultimately making the recovery effort that much more difficult,” stated Eric.

After both rotators were able to bring the mixer tub up against the guardrail, the rigging was uninstalled and replaced on the rear and center of the mixer tub to prepare the entire tub to be completely lifted off the ground and placed onto Big Wheel’s lowbed Landoll trailer. The mixer tub was lifted off the ground slightly to ensure that the lifting points allowed the tub to be equally balanced.

With the tub balanced, it was elevated above the guardrail and rotated over the roadway. When the lowbed was in position, the tub was rotated the remainder of the way above the roadway and slowly lowered down onto the lowbed trailer where it was secured for transport. The lowbed trailer was then relocated in front of the rest of the equipment in the breakdown lane so that traffic could be allowed to pass through.

With all of the major pieces involved in the accident, as well as all of the large pieces of debris removed from the scene, the recovery crews went back into the woods to finish the cleanup and collect the remainder of debris that was left behind.

“Our crews also cleaned up the large amount of hydraulic fluid and transmission oil that leaked from the mixer into the environment as a result of the initial impact,” Eric said. “After all of the debris and contaminants were successfully removed, the entire affected area was returned to its pre-accident condition and both the mixer and mixer tub were transported back to our Freetown storage facility.”

“Once back at our facility, our crane had to again be setup and the same method of rigging utilized in order to remove the mixer from our Landoll trailer and the fully loaded mixer tub from the lowbed trailer. Once removed from the trailers, our crane placed both pieces into storage.”

Special Note: Members of the Dartmouth Police Department presented Eric with a Citizen Appreciation Award on Sept. 20 in recognition of his effort in assisting Officer Chris Flechsig during an arrest.

Show Yours @ TIW
Do you have a recovery to share with TIW readers? Send some pics and info to our Field Editor Jim “Buck” Sorrenti at jimchaos69@yahoo.com; your story may even be selected for print in American Towman magazine!

Mangled Mixer in Mass. (part 1)

0 e2944By Jim “Buck” Sorrenti

Big Wheel Towing & Recovery of East Freetown, Massachusetts, led by the father-and-son team of Bob and Eric Fouquette, has a well-earned reputation for handling technically difficult recoveries, being thorough, attention to details and leaving nothing to chance from paperwork to cleanup.

Back in 2016, Big Wheel received a call from the Dartmouth State Police barracks.

“We received a call to respond immediately,” Eric said, “to the area of Route 24S between exits 10 and 9 for a serious accident involving a fully loaded cement mixer that had veered off the roadway at highway speeds, traveled approximately 150- or 200-feet into the thickly wooded area behind the steel guardrail system and was disabled as a result of the accident. They further stated that the loaded mixer took down dozens of large trees causing extensive damage to the mixer.”

As a result of the severe impact, the front axle was completely ripped out from underneath the mixer. The fully loaded mixer tub consisting of 11 yards of concrete became dislodged from its cradle. The momentum caused it to lunge forward, crushing the cab of the mixer beyond recognition and catapulting the mixer tub another 100’ forward. The significant distance the tub traveled nearly put it up against the backyard fence of a residence.

When the mixer finally came to rest as a mangled mess, it left a massive debris field that included springs, U-bolts, fenders, transmission components and much more. The driver of the now-mangled mixer sustained severe injuries and had to be med-flighted from the scene.

Bob, his sons Eric and David, and several operators responded to the scene with both of their heavy-duty rotators; a 2017 Kenworth/60-ton Jerr-Dan rotator and their 2016 Peterbilt/50-ton Century rolling boom rotator, along with their 2001 International Hazmat Response Truck, and a JCB excavator.

The state police had the breakdown lane and first travel lane coned off, limiting traffic to a second travel lane.

Their first task was to clear a path through the thickly wooded area so that the recovery crew could reach the mixer and the mixer tub. They used chain saws to cut a clear path to be able to recover the mixer and mixer tub from the woods.

“Creating and constructing a path to both the mixer and mixer tub was time consuming,” said Eric, “due to the substantial distance they both had traveled from the roadway. Once the large trees were successfully removed, our JCB excavator was used to dig up any and all large stumps that were in the direct line of recovery, as well.”

As the excavator operator continued clearing the path, other team members staged the rotators on the roadway to prepare for the recovery. Another crewmember used torches to cut two large holes into the front of the mixer tub to run heavy-duty chains through when it came time for the rotators to recover it from the woods.

Once the path was created, the excavator retrieved all of the larger pieces of debris that were too large to pick up by hand. The largest was the entire front axle, which was rigged with a heavy-duty recovery strap and a rotator lifted it off the ground, up and over the guardrail, and placed it down onto the breakdown lane.

The clearing done, the mixer could be recovered. The rotator was boomed over the guardrail and lines from both of the upper winches were brought down the embankment by crewmembers to the area where the mixer was located. Two heavy-duty chain bridles were attached to both the front and rear of the mixer and both of the rotator's upper winch lines were attached to the bridles. Tension was placed on both winches and the mixer was slowly winched out of the woods and up the embankment.

Eric explained, “Once the mixer was brought close enough up against the steel guardrail, and all of the necessary rigging was properly installed, the entire mixer was lifted straight up off the ground, elevated to a height above the steel guardrail system, and rotated up and over the guardrail. At that time, Mass State Police stopped all traffic so that our Landoll trailer could be backed down onto the open travel lane. Once the Landoll trailer was properly positioned, our crane continued to rotate the entire mixer over both lanes of travel and slowly lowered the mixer down onto our Landoll trailer.”

The mixer was secured onto the Landoll for transport and the front axle that had been placed in the breakdown lane was rigged. Once rigged, the axle was lifted and rotated around the front of the rotator and lowered into the center cavity of the mixer and secured in place. When everything on the Landoll was properly secured, it was relocated into the breakdown lane in front of Big Wheel’s other equipment so that the lane could be open for traffic to flow freely.

(Editor’s Note: Stay tuned for part 2 in next week’s Tow Industry Week.)

Show Yours @ TIW
Do you have a recovery to share with TIW readers? Send some pics and info to our Field Editor Jim “Buck” Sorrenti at jimchaos69@yahoo.com; your story may even be selected for print in American Towman magazine!
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WESTERN -Monrovia, CA
$$180
(pop. (Population: 36)

SOUTHERN - Nacogdoches, TX
$$150
(pop. (Population: 32)

EASTERN - Owings Mills, MD
$$75
(pop. (Population: 30)

NORTHERN Dover, NH
$$90
(pop. (Population 30,6)

Light-Duty nonconsensual tow rates as provided by Police Towers of America.
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October 16 - October 22, 2019

Septic System Recovery: It’s a Crappy Job

collpasedseptictank 214d3By Randall C. Resch

In most American communities, underground pipes, vaults and septic tanks have been buried for more than half a century. Because their design and building components—like rebar, adobe pipes and cement—are well-worn, time has a funny way of causing tensile strength to deteriorate. Over time, moisture causes rust to weaken rebar where adobe pipes and cement oftentimes becomes mushy and fragile.

Driving any vehicle of size over a timeworn vault or septic tank is an accident waiting to happen. This kind of recovery happens all the time, but towers aren’t always thinking of what it takes to lessen the possibility of creating any further damage to underground utilities or what health risks they’re causing.

Pulling Splinters

When working septic recoveries, tow operators must understand the complexity of the recovery before commencing. It’s appropriate to recommend that towers follow the required technique of “GOAL,” demanding that towers actively Get Out And Look.

If you’re working a recovery that drops in from above, the best way is to remove it the way it went in. Like the old splinter theory suggests, remove the casualty vehicle from the path and direction the vehicle was headed when it dropped or crashed. When recoveries are “drop-ins,” consideration must be made to lift vs. not winching out.

I recall an incident where a tow company was dispatched to tow a small foreign car that was parked behind a dilapidated rental complex. Because it was a rural property, there were plenty of open spaces leading to a dozen or so cabin-like mini-houses. The car to be towed was parked next to one of the small houses and was easily reached from the entry road.

The tower opted to drive across a small sidewalk that was between the house and where the car was parked. As he drove slowly toward the car, the front end of his wrecker broke through the top of a 50,000-gal. cement septic vault and came to rest midway on its frame.

Simply dropping through the septic tank’s lid wasn’t reason for panic; but the tower called one of his co-workers who arrived in another wrecker. The plan: simply winch it out. Because the partially submerged wrecker’s front wheels were beyond one of the septic tanks walls, they proceeded to rip down one of the walls in winching the wrecker backwards. That released excrement onto the surrounding dirt, elevating a not-so-problematic recovery into a monstrous environmental health hazard.

Release the Nasty

When liquid excrement is released into the soils and the environment, what comes with it is an immediate emergency shut down, an extremely expensive clean-up scenario and the need to rebuild the septic tank itself. There will certainly be red tape and fines that will be bestowed on you. When damages are excessive like this, having to house all of the surrounding residents until the county says it’s OK to let them move back in is another cost to factor into the claim.

Above there’s a picture of the aftermath of a commercial trash truck that dropped nose-first into a collapsed septic tank in a similar manner as the example explained. There’s much to know about approach, turn around, and access where a large-sized tow vehicle can or can’t go. Obviously, one key factor that towers must fully understand commences with a GOAL strategy; septic lines and tanks are typically in line where houses or structures are situated.

If there’s a property owner or facility manager on site at your tow or recovery location, ask about buried leach lines, septic tanks or other underground utilities.

Equally important is knowing when to say “no,” especially when your own tow company doesn’t have a rotator in its fleet. Do not take on any job that you’re not equipped or trained to do. For small rural companies, there’s nothing wrong with teaming up with another properly equipped company with a construction crane and sharing the invoice.

Septic system recoveries means unfavorable work, and towers may have to get in or near the muck when they’re hooking up. Be sure to have a septic sucking truck on scene to lower the level of nasty. Personal protective equipment is important: wear rain gear, heavy rain boots, eye, protection and preferably nitrile gloves to protect your skin. Work slowly and methodically to lessen any potential of personal exposure.

Randall Resch is American Towman’s and Tow Industry Week’s Operations Editor, a former California police officer, tow business owner and retired civilian off-road instructor for Navy Special Warfare. Randall is an approved instructor for towers serving the California Highway Patrol’s rotation contract. His course is approved by the California law enforcement community. He has written over 500 industry-related articles for print and on-line, is a member of the International Towing & Recovery Hall of Fame, and, a recipient of the 2017 Dave Jones Leadership Award.









Operation Safe Driver

Tow 645f3By Brian J Riker

Earlier this month the Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance released its data from the Operation Safe Driver campaign conducted with law enforcement throughout North America. After a week-long safety blitz, the results revealed that commercial drivers still have a long way to go regarding road safety. The overall violation rate should be much lower than the current 10%, as compared to passenger vehicles.

With a targeted message that “late won’t kill you,” the primary focus was to target speeding and distracted driving by both cars and commercial vehicles. During the blitz, 46,752 citations and 87,624 warnings were given. The top violation was speeding with 17,556 citations--1,454 of which went to commercial drivers.

The second highest cited offense was failure to use seat belts, with 954 citations issued to commercial drivers. Use of hand-held devices was fourth on the list with 249 citations and 170 warnings issued to commercial drivers.

Troublesome, yet much better than the rate of hand held device violations issued to passenger vehicles with 416 citations and 400 warnings. Hand-held device violations for passenger vehicles was sixth on the list of the top 10 violations discovered.

Failure to wear a seat belt, failure to obey a traffic control device, wreckless/careless driving and being under the influence of drugs or alcohol were also in the top 10 violations for both groups.

This is alarming since driver behavior is a factor in 94% of all crashes! As the professional driver we must be always vigilant in our defensive driving practices. We must drive our truck as well as pay attention for the other motorists that are doing everything except driving.

The value of defensive driving was highlighted this weekend when I presented a seminar on distracted driving for the tow operator during the MidWest Regional Tow Show. It was well-attended and the audience was very active in their participation. Many questions and anecdotal stories about near misses and other bad behaviors were expressed.

If you have not had a chance to take a defensive driving course I strongly encourage you to do so. There are many great resources for these classes including free presentations given by insurance companies. In addition, I will speak on this subject during the American Towman Exposition in Atlantic City, New Jersey, this December. I will share real experiences from three decades of professional driving across the nation.

The bottom line is, as professionals we must hold ourselves to a higher standard of care when operating motor vehicles than the rest of the public does. Stay safe and always be alert.

Keep these 5 tips for safe driving in mind at all times.
Look far ahead, at least 15 seconds
Keep a safe following distance. Manage the space around your vehicle
Never get stuck in a pack of vehicles; always have a way out.

Don’t speed

Be sure to be seen with your lights on. Make eye contact when needed

Brian J Riker is a third generation towman and President of Fleet Compliance Solutions, LLC and is a contributing writer to American Towman Magazine and Tow Industry Week. He specializes in helping non-traditional fleets such as towing, repossession, and construction companies navigate the complex world of Federal and State transportation regulatory compliance. With 25 years of experience in the ditch as a tow operator Brian truly understands the unique needs and challenges faced by towing companies today. He can be reached at brian.riker@fleetcompliancesolutions.net

How Long Should It Take?

CodyBlowers e2d27By Randall C. Resch
(Image - Cody Blowers, St. George [Utah] News)

A crash occurred outside St. George, Utah, when a semi was driving too fast for wintery conditions. It lost control, slid onto the highway’s shoulder and into a flatbed carrier and a police vehicle at the scene. An important statement in a newspaper article of the incident caught my attention.

A Utah Highway Patrol officer who was on scene questioned the amount of time it was taking the tow operator to work the recovery.

The officer commented to a reporter, “The tow truck was taking longer than I thought, so I went down to check on them.” As the officer was speaking to towers, he reported that one of the towmen noticed a semi starting to slide as it headed toward their vehicles situated in the inside lanes. The semi’s trailer hit one of the tow trucks, which in turn rammed the patrol car, spinning it into a pinned position against the other tow truck.

I felt as if the officer may have been pushing blame towards the towman working too slow. There are plenty of reasons that justify why progress may have slowed, so I’ll ask two questions:

1) How can towers pre-plan a tactical approach to difficult recoveries?
2) What do towers do when faced with recovery problems that take more time than anticipated?

The Clock Starts Now

Ours is an industry where law enforcement has little knowledge to the on-scene dangers that exist at crashes and recoveries. Add a mix of wintery conditions like ice and snow, and working in those conditions has its own heightened elements of danger. Working to upright an overturned semi is an incredible task in normal weather, let alone sub-zero conditions.

Many officers have an expectation that recoveries take time and typically provide operators the time to complete their work.

However, when Mother Nature releases a wicked, blinding snowstorm or when anything and everything is iced and frozen solid, there’s a fear factor that anticipates a secondary crash at recovery site.

If your recovery is technical and difficult, talk factually and openly with the scene’s Incident Commander or investigating officer to explain the nature and difficulty of the recovery. When recovery becomes problematic, keep the IC or officer aware of the progress or problems associated with your recovery.

Action vs. Reaction

Trained vs. untrained operators sometimes create the reasons towers take more time than expected. Untrained towmen may create a self-induced uneasy feeling that they’re not capable of doing the work. Always keep in mind there’s an existing “action vs. reaction” when working recoveries: meaning when speed of recovery goes up, something gets overlooked causing safety to go down.

That’s when accidents happen.

The same goes for officers who think the towman is taking too much time doing a rollover with a carrier. When rollovers using carriers take too long, officers sometimes get antsy only to order the tower to drag the wreck up on its roof. Accordingly, tow companies should only be sending their varsity players to work highway recoveries.

Take the time that’s necessary to work in a calculated and exacting manner when it comes to on scene safety. Never let an IC, investigating officer or firefighter agitate you when it comes to loading a vehicle or working difficult recoveries. There’s a right way and a wrong way in gaining your safety goals. Always err on the side of safety.

At the same time, solid communication goes a long, long way. When operators know their equipment and what techniques are proper for recovery, most officers typically resume police work—which should include traffic control. There’s nothing worse than having a cop in your face and telling you how to do your job, especially when you have the skills to do so. For the over-aggressive cop, maybe you should offer them the controls and have them show you how it’s done.

Randall Resch is American Towman's and Tow Industry Week’s Operations Editor, a former California police officer, tow business owner and retired civilian off-road instructor for Navy Special Warfare. Randall is an approved instructor for towers serving the California Highway Patrol's rotation contract. His course is approved by the California law enforcement community. He has written over 500 industry-related articles for print and on-line, is a member of the International Towing & Recovery Hall of Fame, and, a recipient of the 2017 Dave Jones Leadership Award.






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October 16 - October 22, 2019

A New, Modern Design

0 9cc9cBy George L. Nitti

Over the last couple of years, KT Towing & Recovery of Ladson, South Carolina, has revamped its graphics to reflect a cleaner, more modern design.

“All of our newer trucks have similar branding now,” said manager Josh Morris, son of owner Tim Morris. “The old design was outdated and very basic.”

The company turned to a local sign guy who partially wrapped several of their newest trucks, including the one Morris drives: a 2019 Ford F-550 with a Jerr-Dan MPL-40 Series.

Morris said, “I picked it up about a year ago, around Thanksgiving. Once we saw the design, we knew we couldn’t go back.”

At its core, the green, modern lines that flow on the side doors cut through the center of the graphic, making the unit pop against a white background.

“Green is one of our main colors; that’s why we went with it,” Morris said.

The business name also stands out in large, silver lettering. The company phone number along with the business name are both embellished with a silver gradient and black shadow making them easy to read and see.

“The letters refer to my father,” said Tim. “ ‘K’ stands for ‘Krazy’ and ‘T’ for ‘Tim.’ ”

The checkered background, found on many tow trucks, is pronounced on the upper half of the graphic. Also embedded and partially hidden in this slick graphic is a part of a car.

The AAA logo reveals a big reason the company added four new trucks to their fleet this past year, as they have gone from buying used vehicles to new ones.

Morris said, “We needed more dependable trucks. In the past they were breaking down. Instead of putting money to repairs, we are now putting it towards repayment plans.”

On the front of the wrecker, Josh’s customized license plate bears his name.

“My mom made it for me and I decided to put it on,” he said. “I’m the one that mostly drives this truck.”

Brag @ TIW! Should your truck be featured here? Send a few pics and your contact information to the editor at bdooley@towman.com. You might even be selected to go in print, too, in American Towman magazine!

Burning Up The Road

0 ba0b4By George L. Nitti

Some tow trucks “look hot”--so much so that you can feel your temperature rising.

Baker & Baker Towing and Crane Service in Woodburn, Oregon, and owned by Kevin Baker, found one such “hot”-themed wrecker when they went to Idaho Wrecker Sales in pursuit of a new tow truck in 2016.

You might say it was love at first sight.

“We didn’t have anything in mind,” said company general manager John Harmon. “Our truck was pre-built and wrapped to go. When we saw it, we really liked it because we thought it was different.”

The unit is a 2016 Dodge Ram 5500 with a Chevron Autoloader.

It took first place at the American Towman Cup wrecker pageant in Las Vegas in 2016, winning in the Light-Duty 2015-2016 category.

Harmon said, “Idaho Wrecker sent it to a graphic designer, who came up with the flames.”

Fire abounds on the unit, jumping and dancing around its bottom half and the hood, where flames are realistically rendered.

It’s a captivating image that is hard to forget, especially to those on the West Coast who have experienced forest fires over the last several years.

Harmon said, “People like the flames. They’ve said, ‘They haven’t seen anything like it.’”

On the unit as well, the Baker & Baker names stand out in a silver-scripted lettering.

It’s no coincidence that this fiery truck is right at home in a place called Woodburn.

Brag @ TIW! Should your truck be featured here? Send a few pics and your contact information to the editor at bdooley@towman.com. You might even be selected to go in print, too, in American Towman magazine!

Dallas Cowboys-Themed Truck

0 3e128By George L. Nitti

Not far from the Mexican border in Laredo, Texas, Orozco’s Crane and Towing, one of the biggest tow companies in south Texas, expresses its love for the NFL’s Dallas Cowboys on a ’Boys-themed tow truck.

As a matter of fact, the company’s love of the Cowboys is right up there with loving one’s job and one’s family. According to office manager Nikki Ramirez, “At Orozco’s Crane and Towing there are three things we love: our job, our family and our Cowboys.”

Although their heavy-duty trucks are red and white, this particular 2007 Peterbilt 379/Century 9055 takes on the enduring blue and white of the Dallas Cowboys.

Of course, without the blue Cowboys star, blue and white could signify anything; but to give it that mark of distinction, the easily recognizable star stands out on each side of the cab. Also written in blue against its white background is the truck’s lettering and phone number.

“Mr. Joe Orozco (the owner) treats all his 49 employees like family, which we in return treat our customers as family,” Ramirez said.
Promoting that “family feeling” is core to the company values, where it is further conveyed through their company slogan, “There Is a Difference,” found on the side door.

“Orozco’s stands by our service and we work our best to make sure our customers get professional drivers, with good clean tow trucks and the best service,” Ramirez said. “We keep our word that everything is going to be safe and our drivers are always on point.”

Brag @ TIW! Should your truck be featured here? Send a few pics and your contact information to the editor at bdooley@towman.com. You might even be selected to go in print, too, in American Towman magazine!
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October 16 - October 22, 2019

Tanker Tube for Easier Uprights

product0000 34f7bB/A Products’ new Tanker Tube is a lightweight and non-sparking tube that makes uprighting tankers, tank trailers or buses easier; insert through man-ways, attach rigging and lift! The Tanker Tube is a patent-pending lifting device that works as a lifting beam with a working load limit of 10,000 lbs., or as a tanker tube with a working load limit of 18,000 lbs.

baprod.com

Century’s Right Approach

DSC01563 05bacCentury’s Right Approach provides the versatility of having a straight carrier deck with the added benefit of an angled approach plate only when you need it for exotic or low-clearance vehicles. The Right Approach allows the operator to lower the approach angle to 6 degrees, without making use of ramps or wood planks. Available on Century 10 and 12 Series steel carriers, The Right Approach has a release handle that lowers the rear hinged deck section. A cable guide is inserted in the deck to keep the cable low while winching the vehicle onto the rear deck.
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October 16 - October 22, 2019
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October 16 - October 22, 2019
Last week’s ALS Resolvion’s Innovations in Recovery Summit featured (l. to r.) Mike Levison of ALS Resolvion; Justin Zane of Recovery Database Network; Andy Sinclair of International Recovery Systems; and Cort DeHart of MBSi Corp. Image - Nick Zulovich.

ALS Resolvion Launches [b]Impound Pro

Skip-trace and repossession management firm ALS Resolvion recently released a new impound management service called Impound Pro. 

The “end-to-end” service is designed to address the major “pain points” in the current process of handling vehicles that have been impounded. The firm explained these can include operational inefficiencies, excessive expense, exposure to lien loss and issues remarketing the vehicle.

Impound Pro includes VIN monitoring, impound yard negotiation, legal services support, value assessment support, speedy recovery, remarketing for total loss and end of life vehicles, and insurance claim services. 

The company highlighted the service is available on an “ala carte” basis, giving companies the ability to pick and choose certain components or utilize the service as an end-to-end solution.

Source: autoremarketing.com.

Officer, Attorney Arrested [b]on Grand Theft Charges

Riviera Beach (Florida) police officer Marvin Williams and his wife, attorney Gloria Floyd-Williams, were arrested Sept. 25 on grand theft auto and burglary charges after deputies said they took Floyd-Williams' car illegally from a repossession lot.

According to the arrest report, surveillance video shows Floyd-Williams entering the lot, getting into her car and then driving back through the gate, hitting a parked car in the process; the video shows her husband letting her through the gate, closing it and then fleeing.

"Floyd-Williams did not have the authority nor permission to enter the fenced compound of ATR, had not signed the proper paperwork or paid any fees due for the vehicle to be redeemed," the report said.

Floyd-Williams and Williams came back later and told deputies they had gotten a release from the bank and the manager refused to release her car so she took it, but deputies said there was probable cause for the charges.

Floyd-Williams said the tow company was trying to hold her car illegally after she provided documentation showing it was supposed to be released.

Her lawyer said the tow company was in the wrong.

"The charges will be dropped, that's the word I got. And I'm going after the tow company for the information they gave the police officers," her attorney said.

The St. Lucie County Sheriff's Office said they are moving forward with the case and have no knowledge of the charges being dropped.

Officer Williams was relieved of all law enforcement duties effective September 26, and was placed on paid administrative leave pending the outcome of the criminal proceedings and an internal affairs investigation.

Source: wpbf.com.

Industry Must Continue to [b]Adopt Technology: Experts

Recovery Database Network chief executive officer of Recovery Database Network (RDN) and Clearplan Justin Zane offered vivid imagery to finance company attendees during ALS Resolvion’s Innovations in Recovery Summit last week on the topic of updates regarding agencies’ efforts to find vehicles that are out for repossession.

“Visualize a truck backing up to your door every day with 410,000 updates, dumping it and then driving away,” said Zane. “Most agents are contingency now. They’re not going to get paid unless they secure the collateral, so the actions don’t stop,” Zane continued. “These agencies are still going to run all these accounts repetitively try to secure your collateral, but their updates that they’re sending back to you, you can’t consume them.”

MBSi Corp. president Cort DeHart participated on the panel, as well, chiming in on Zane’s descriptions.

Both Zane and DeHart explained that their technology companies not only are trying to change industry habits, but also streamline processes by leveraging technology. Especially since when it comes to charge-offs, repossessions and recoveries, time truly is money.

Zane described enhanced ways firms are getting updates to finance companies.

“Whether it’s through API, whether you’re logging into Cort’s system, whether you’re logging into mine, you’re consuming all this data. What we’re trying to do is we’re trying to ease the industry into the process. Instead of a text update, what you’ll be receiving is kind of a categorized set of updates,” Zane said.

“If it’s a simple, ‘Ran the address, no unit found,’ that’s going to be an update type. And the next phase of that is also going to be your kind of discounted, or your invalidated information, because a lot of a lot of agencies will tell you in an update that this address is no longer any good. But per your automated systems, you are still asking for an update on 123 Main Street, even though on the first day, that agency told you this address is no good. It’s vacant, and it was vacant three times I ran it for three other companies,” he continued.

“So what we want to do is categorize those into buckets, if you will, or update types. The only thing you’re going to be doing is actually filtering through either we found new information, or we need information. But the simple status updates, we think that those are a thing of the past,” Zane went on to say.

DeHart also insisted the repossession industry must continue to adopt technology to improve itself. He pointed to significant reductions in wrongful repossessions since mobile technology can connect the finance company with the repossession agent almost instantly if the customer finds the funds to redeem their contact and become current.

“I will say that to the extent that we can use data to make decisions in real time, that are not monolithic across the board, across the whole portfolio, but the ability to consume the data, use it to drive workflow and processes downstream, that might be where we could get in the near future. And I think that’s a huge step forward,” DeHart said.

Source: autoremarketing.com

Wells Fargo Picks Charles [b]Scharf as New CEO

Wells Fargo & Co. announced Charles Scharf as its next chief executive, marking a new era in the bank’s efforts to turn itself around after a series of scandals claimed two previous CEOs in the last three years.

Scharf, the CEO of Bank of New York Mellon Corp., will replace interim chief Allen Parker on Oct. 21, capping a wide-ranging hunt for an outsider who could fix the San Francisco-based lender’s relations with the government and reinvigorate the bank, whose stock has fallen behind rivals’ in recent months.

“With more than 24 years in leadership roles in the banking and payments industries, including as CEO of Visa Inc. and Bank of New York Mellon, Charlie has demonstrated a strong track record,” Wells Fargo Chair Betsy Duke said in a statement.

The appointment ends a six-month search after former chief  Tim Sloan stepped down in March, bowing to political and regulatory scrutiny.

Scharf, 54, will be charged with mending ties in Washington, where Wells Fargo’s problems are hardly over: The bank still faces several investigations and outstanding consent orders, including a growth restriction imposed by the Federal Reserve.

Because of the intense regulatory scrutiny, Scharf’s appointment was subject to approval from the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency, which said in a statement that it had “no supervisory objection.”

Source: latimes.com
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